Sunday, May 11, 2014

INTRODUCTION, FOREWORD etc. (QUESTIONS)

INTRODUCTION



On 13 July 2013, a news story ‘went viral’ around the world.

Joao Maria de Souza, 45, had been in bed with his wife Leni when a cow fell through the ceiling of their home in Caratinga, southeast Brazil. 

The animal is believed to have escaped from a nearby farm and climbed onto the roof of the couple's house, which backs onto a steep hill. The corrugated roof gave way and the one-and-a-half-ton creature fell eight feet onto Mr de Souza's side of the bed…

Events like this have always prompted serious questions.

(When I was a high school English teacher back in the 1960s the first essay my classes wrote had the title: ‘Shut your windows, lock your doors, and disaster will fall from the sky’).

* Why does a meteor fall on some people and not others – and most of them on no one at all? 

* Is this simply ‘chance’ or ‘luck’? 

* Are the powers ‘up there’ – gods or whatever – playing nasty games with us?

This book hopefully provides some answers to these questions, mainly from a Judeo-Christian perspective.

Shalom!

Rowland Croucher
(This Blog: May 12, 2014)

NOTE: THIS BLOG IS A POT-POURRI OF ARTICLES, NOTES, IDEAS - MANY STILL TO BE FULLY FORMED. I'M DRIBBLING SOME ARTICLES ON TO THE jmm.org.au WEBSITE FROM TIME TO TIME...
DEADLINE FOR FINISHED MSS.: OCTOBER 2014

INTRODUCTION: More...


Have you heard of the ‘Swan-song phenomenon’? Psychologist Dean Keith Simonton of the University of California studied 1919 musical compositions written by 172 classical composers and compared how highly the works were rated by musicologists with how close the creation of those works came to the composers’ deaths.

Main finding: compositions that were written later in the artists’ lives – when, as Simonton wrote, ‘death was raising a fist to knock on the door’ – tended to be briefer, with cleaner, simpler melody lines, and yet scored high in aesthetic significance according to the experts. (Time, ‘The Art of Living’, September 23, 2013, p. 42).

I’m now 76, and it’s about 20 years since my last book was published. This little contribution is my best effort to say in a ‘cleaner, simpler’ fashion what I believe about the most important questions facing humankind. Writers these days can put their words together in a ‘cryptic teasing’ fashion: if the reader wants to know more about something, they can simply check with everyone’s friend Google Search.

As my Gmail auto-signature says…

Shalom! Salaam! Pax!
Rowland Croucher
jmm.org.au

MORE - Blog: Q&R: The Most Important Questions Ever Asked 
Post: Introduction 
Link: http://questionsresponses.blogspot.com/2013/09/introduction.html 

INTRODUCTION (ROUGH NOTES) Q&R 

TED TALK: MAPPING IDEAS WORTH SPREADING. SUMMARIZED EVERYTHING - EVERYTHING! - IN ? TALKS  BY  ? WORLD 'S EXPERTS. 

OVER THE YEARS TWO COLUMNISTS - GEORGE WILL (POLITICALLY RIGHT OF CENTRE, NEWSWEEK); MORE RECENTLY FAREED ZAKARIA (MIDDLE OF THE ROAD, TIME MAGAZINE) WHO COULD SUMMARIZE A *BIG IDEA* IN AN 800-WORD ONE PAGE ARTICLE.

Just now read Zakaria's summary of one of the world's most intractable problems - issues around forging a deal over Iran's nuclear program - 'No Deal? Don't Just Blame Iran' Time November 2013.  Brilliant! French, Americans, Israelis, Saudis, Iraneans - unique incompatible agendas...

OK. If we were to 'map ideas' from the best minds/writers on the 31 most important questions people ask - about life, death, God, evil, happiness, relationships... Whatever.  In just 800 words per question... What would that look like?

FOREWORD


Two versions? Check

FOREWORD

When someone makes an appointment to see me, a 'generalist' pastoral counselor, what do we talk about?  Short answer: anything at all that's important for them.

Within the first five minutes I invite my parishioner/client to 'give me a headline or two'. And, then, mostly, we jump into the deep end. Some memorable ones:

#  'Rowland, I used to belong to a biker gang. Recently I've started going to church and I heard about the need to 'confess your sins to one another'. Well, I killed seven people during those wild years... And nobody else knows... '

# 'Pastor, I'm in my fifties now, and I've never had a close relationship with a man. I'd love to have been a mother, but it's too late. I have a strong sexual drive and my way of dealing with that is to pleasure myself. My pastor, however, is a fundamentalist who reckons I'll go to hell for doing what I do. I'm scared and often sleepless about it all. What do you think?'

#  To a 15/16-year-old: 'Jane, what do you want to do with your life?' 'Oh, that's easy: kill a couple of people.' 'Uh-huh... Anything else?' 'Yeah... burn down the [social welfare organisation's] building: they should have been protecting me...'

# Undergrad student: 'We're doing philosophy, and recently studied the so-called "proofs" for God's existence. My evangelical friend says he's impressed by the "first cause" idea. I reckon there could have been an infinite regression of causes...'

Where do these conversations go from there? Read on. Here are my 31 'big ones': one for each day of the month if you want to give yourself some quality-time thinking about these issues and chasing up the footnotes...  (This is the first book I've written post-Google: love it!).

At this point you may need to know just a little about me. General ideological approach? 'Progressive Evangelical Christian'. Not theologically 'fundamentalist' or 'liberal' - I have strong issues with some of their respective presuppositions. My Anglican friends say I'm 'broad church'. Father Richard Rohr and popular Christian writer Brian McLaren are generally OK! Is there truth in other religions? Of course, God's truth can be discovered in the most unlikely places. Is it OK to doubt what authority-figures put into our heads when we were impressionable? Again: of course. How much serious pastoral counseling have I actually done? About 25,000 hours, starting when I was a College Christian student leader in 1957, then within eleven full- and part-time pastoral vocations, etc. etc.

Come and enjoy the ride my fellow-strugglers/learners...



When someone makes an appointment to see me, a 'generalist' pastoral counselor, what do we talk about?  Short answer: anything at all that's important for them.

Within the first five minutes I invite my parishioner/client to 'give me a headline or two'. And, then, mostly, we jump into the deep end. Some memorable ones:

#  'Rowland, I used to belong to a biker gang. Recently I've started going to church and I heard about the need to 'confess your sins to one another'. Well, I killed seven people during those wild years... And nobody else knows... '

# 'Pastor, I'm in my fifties now, and I've never had a close relationship with a man. I'd love to have been a mother, but it's too late. I have a strong sexual drive and my way of dealing with that is to pleasure myself. My pastor, however, is a fundamentalist who reckons I'll go to hell for doing what I do. I'm scared and often sleepless about it all. What do you think?'

#  To a 15/16-year-old: 'Jane, what do you want to do with your life?' 'Oh, that's easy: kill a couple of people.' 'Uh-huh... Anything else?' 'Yeah... burn down the [social welfare organisation's] building: they should have been protecting me...'

# Undergrad student: 'We're doing philosophy, and recently studied the so-called "proofs" for God's existence. My evangelical friend says he's impressed by the "first cause" idea. I reckon there could have been an infinite regression of causes...'

Where do these conversations go from there? Read on. Here are my 31 'big ones': one for each day of the month if you want to give yourself some quality-time thinking about these issues and chasing up the footnotes...  (This is the first book I've written post-Google: love it!).

At this point you may need to know just a little about me. General ideological approach? 'Progressive Evangelical Christian'. Not theologically 'fundamentalist' or 'liberal' - I have strong issues with some of their respective presuppositions. My Anglican friends say I'm 'broad church'. Father Richard Rohr and popular Christian writer Brian McLaren are generally OK! Is there truth in other religions? Of course, God's truth can be discovered in the most unlikely places. Is it OK to doubt what authority-figures put into our heads when we were impressionable? Again: of course. How much serious pastoral counseling have I actually done? About 25,000 hours, starting when I was a College Christian student leader in 1957, then within eleven full- and part-time pastoral vocations, from 1964 until this week!

Come and enjoy the ride my fellow-strugglers/learners...

Rowland Croucher        (rcroucher@gmail.com)
Melbourne, Australia
May 2014

~~


George F/ Will, Zakaria (Time)More important to be reflective than either conservative or radical.

Reflective persons are seekers-after-truth, an asker-of-questions...

The wise person who wrote Ecclesiastes was like this: 'I directed my mind to know, to  investigate, and to seek wisdom and an explanation' (7:25)

At the end of the day, when I am lying in bed and I know the chances of any of our theology being exactly right are a million to one, I need to know that God has things figured out, that if my maths are wrong I'm still going to be OK.

~~



Christianity may be weird, but it has a quiet strength

  • MILTON JONES
  • HERALD SUN
  • APRIL 02, 2014 

Over the centuries Christianity is a faith that has caused a huge splash, writes Milton J
Over the centuries Christianity is a faith that has caused a huge splash, writes Milton Jones. Source:News Limited
HELLO, I’m a comedian who is here for the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. I am also a Christian … and if you are still reading this you may be interested to know there is nothing directly about my faith in my act. But I’ve been asked to write about something I care about, so here goes.
Melbourne’s St Patrick’s Cathedral has a fountain with the inscription, “He that drinks of the water that I shall give, will never have thirst again”.
But no more than a few metres away there is also a sign that says, “Recycled water. Do not drink”. That, to me neatly sums up most peoples’ attitude towards Christianity. Nice idea — but in practice whatever you do — don’t swallow it!
I think God’s creation is like him — inexplicably clever, outrageously excessive and a bit weird. But too many of us Christians just manage the “a bit weird” part (Often that isn’t helped by the media, which tries to find the oddest person with the most extreme views to represent Christianity).
Sometimes the church doesn’t help itself. I mean, run it past me one more time: Jesus came to identify with the suffering of ordinary people and now his chief “representatives” live in huge palaces and wear big pointy hats?
Also, sometimes it’s almost as if Christians can’t cope with the fact that if you really say “sorry”, God really does just let you off — so we have to make up other rules and special ways of talking, to sort of help punish everyone.
Often we Christians aren’t very good at saying sorry ourselves. Apparently, the Pope’s first tweet was “Praise the Lord”. Perhaps it should have been “OMG earth not centre of universe, soz Copernicus LOL” (To me, one of the mysteries of Christianity is why many Christians rarely admit that so much of it is a mystery). Maybe it all appears too weird, too confusing and you can’t take the risk of testing the waters, or possibly even being poisoned. But my point is, can you afford not to? We all have a natural revulsion against clear evil. It’s just if you’re an atheist it’s harder to explain.
Most of us agree, that both good and bad has been done in the name of religion, but maybe the bigger question is why we are talking about bad and good in the first place?
Yes, there’s superstition, fear and even abuse in the name of Christianity, but not everyone who wears the shirt of Melbourne Storm actually plays for the team, do they? In fact, anyone can buy a replica one and behave how they like. They might even actually support a rival team.
Of course, there are other religions and to be honest I don’t know much about them. All I can say is that when I stop still, I can feel the quiet power of a presence within me.
In my experience, to become a Christian is like being a fly buzzing around a room with no exit. Then someone gently guides you to an open window, when in retrospect it would have been a lot easier just to squash you flat in the first place. You’re free at last, but through no good action of your own.
Yes, many madmen purport to speak on behalf of God — some of them shouting in the high street, while others run whole countries. But over the centuries Christianity is a faith that has caused a huge splash, as people have given up their lives for it in all sorts of different ways.
The ripples still go on. I mean, apart from being involved at the beginning of science, systems of government, philosophy, art, schools, hospitals, the emancipation of women, the abolition of slavery, social welfare, helping form the basis of the moral code most people live by and introducing popular notions of justice, mercy, decency and compassion ... what has Christianity ever really done for the world?
British comedian Milton Jones is appearing at the Melbourne Town Hall’s Supper Room until April 20.
From a thoughtful critic - I don't know what is in your book, Rowland, but if your forward overtly saw it so important as to nail your allegiance to Rohr and McLaren to the mast, it's reasonable to assume you will head in a similar direction to them.

~~
INTRODUCTION (ROUGH NOTES) Q&R

TED TALK: MAPPING IDEAS WORTH SPREADING. SUMMARIZED EVERYTHING - EVERYTHING! - IN ? TALKS  BY  ? WORLD 'S EXPERTS.

OVER THE YEARS TWO COLUMNISTS - GEORGE WILL (POLITICALLY RIGHT OF CENTRE, NEWSWEEK); MORE RECENTLY FAREED ZAKARIA (MIDDLE OF THE ROAD, TIME MAGAZINE) WHO COULD SUMMARIZE A *BIG IDEA* IN AN 800-WORD ONE PAGE ARTICLE.

Just now read Zakaria's summary of one of the world's most intractable problems - issues around forging a deal over Iran's nuclear program - 'No Deal? Don't Just Blame Iran' Time November 2013.  Brilliant! French, Americans, Israelis, Saudis, Iraneans - unique incompatible agendas...

OK. If we were to 'map ideas' from the best minds/writers on the 31 most important questions people ask - about life, death, God, evil, happiness, relationships... Whatever.  In just 800 words per question... What would that look like?

Let's go...

~~

See christianleaders.org - app with list of articles on this iPad.

'Not every question will be your question'... feel free to bounce on to one that is... '

~~


“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes” – Albert Einstein

“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes” – Albert Einstein
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"If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could so...
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  ~~
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Best Googled articles- 
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  ~~
Best Googled articles- 

http://www.jmm.org.au/articles/33330.htm
[Rough draft of an early chapter in my new book, Questions & Responses, to be published later this year, 2014] 
~~

It's 4.05 am April 18, 2014, and I've just been awakened by three experiences: a loud sound, a very recent memory,  and a deep feeling of amazement and grief... 

* The sound of heavy rain - a rarity recently in our dry city of Melbourne, Australia;
* A memory from yesterday, Good Friday. It was a beautiful ecumenical service. We then wandered around the block to engage in an abbreviated Stations of the Cross.
I met a retired mainline church pastor for the first time and heard [again]: 'You're not *the* Rowland Croucher are you?' (To which I lamely responded: Google tells me I'm the only one on the planet at the moment, spelt that way...'). We'll come back to that *the* in a couple of paragraphs...
and

* A feeling of grief for the loved ones of hundreds of students, plus teachers and crew of the Korean ferry  Sewol which hit something in the Yellow Sea a few days ago and sank.  
Reports said one of those rescued from the ferry, Kang Min-gyu, vice principal of the high school whose students made up the majority of those aboard, had committed suicide.
Kang was found hanged near the gymnasium on Jindo island where family members of the victims were gathering, police said, leaving a note that read: "Please hold me responsible for all of this. I pushed for the school excursion. Cremate my body and spread my ashes over the ship sinking site. I may become a teacher again in the afterlife for the students whose bodies have yet to be found."
The 69-year-old captain, Lee Jun-Seok, faces five counts including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law. Lee, who was taken into custody, was reportedly among the first to leave the stricken vessel.
A surviving student said the ferry operator made an announcement asking   passengers to 'Stay Where You Are'. He didn't hear any announcement telling passengers to escape...
~~
'STAY WHERE YOU ARE!'
I got out of bed, put on a couple of layers of warm clothing, and began reminiscing/writing.
From adolescence I've been a pain in the [whatever] because I've challenged people NOT to stay where they were, especially if there may be valid alternatives to their belief-system.

'Questions aren't bad' I used to say to the elders in our Brethren Assembly ['Assembly' = 'church', but we didn't use 'churchy' words because we'd 'come out of the churches' and we - alone - had 'the truth'].

The elders didn't know what to do with stirrers like me. One of those good people used to reply: 'Rowland, don't ask questions, just believe!'

I wrote a page-full of questions when a visiting Brethren Teaching Elder was coming to our group for a 'Question and Answer' evening. Mr. Tom Carson, a nice and scholarly man, did his best with them.

Questions like: 'How is it that some our heroes - people like the missionary Hudson Taylor, and the man-of-faith George Muller - did so well when they didn't agree with some of the things Brethren teach?' [Verbal response: 'Ah, but imagine how much more effective they would have been if they'd been enlightened, as we are...' Visual response: eyes in my direction which sort-of said 'How's that for a good answer, young Rowland?'].

'STAY WHERE YOU ARE'

When I left high school and went to the University of Sydney, I got some insights into the 'Stay Where You Are' phenomenon. Change can be threatening for humans, our Psychology professor told us. Especially changing your mind about something. The idea that it was OK to question ideas you imbibed with your mother's milk - my mother was easily the most formative influence in my life in its first decade - confirmed my attitude-of-dissent.

(Later I was to return to the University of Sydney to do a Master's degree in Social Psychology, majoring on a study of  'the Diffusion of Innovations', especially in religious organisations. More about that later...).

So 'STAY WHERE YOU ARE' can be a recipe for intellectual as well as physical death.

Why did that announcement come over the ship's P/A system? Simplest answer: if people in a perceived emergency run around to save themselves it might cause a riot, and RIOTS ARE BAD. Disorder, chaos, must be avoided at all costs (even, apparently,  at the cost of human lives).

Fast forward to the last year or so. I have a Facebook page which asks lots of questions. My 5000 or so friends have - mostly - got used to this nasty habit of mine (but when the questions get too many/hot I'm 'defriended' by some nervous people, so there are always a few vacancies on the Friends' list). Occasionally a conservative person will post something like: 'Rowland, you've lived for three quarters of a century: isn't it time you found some answers? Do you really have to keep stirring?'

Yes, I do.

And yes, I *have* found some answers, but

I still have a deep-seated horror of Bad Answers to Good Questions.

Yesterday's 'Age' newspaper [18/4/2014, p.34] published an obituary for one of my political heroes, the Independent Senator Brian Harradine, who died last week. 'What,' my friends ask, 'Do you actually agree with the views of this very conservative Catholic?' My response: 'Often no, but I like his attitude.' He refused to be 'boxed-in' on many issues, and took his job as a federal politician very seriously. 'He [often] brooded over policy decisions for days and weeks, consulting widely. His decisions often took people by surprise. He argued for what he believed in whether or not it polled well... [His were] principled stances'. He didn't like the idea of a consumption tax (it would 'discriminate against and hurt the poor'.) He worried that 'Australia was giving priority to trade over China's human rights record and that women in third world countries wanted clean drinking water and help with basic material health before abortion... In 1975 Harradine [had been] expelled from the Australian Labor Party for claiming the ALP had links to the Communist movement. However, this gave him the publicity to be elected to the Senate that year and he was successful in every election until he retired in 2005.'

He was truly independent: 'He drank "silver tea" - a concoction of hot water and milk. He was frugal with himself and generous with others... He had that rare ability to fully engage with whoever he was speaking to and would greet cleaning staff the same way he would colleagues. He also took an active interest in the lives of his staff and their families...'

I like that man!

But, again, no, I don't like some aspects of his [Catholic] conservatism - which probably had something to do with the fact that 'he is survived by his second wife, Marion, his six children, her seven children and many grandchildren').

'STAY WHERE YOU ARE'!

As the economic storm clouds gathered in terms of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, the advice from Australia's Federal Treasury was: 'Go early, go hard, and go households'. Fortunately our [Labor] government did just that, and I'm proud that our country weathered the storm better than any other...
[More to come...]

~~

GOOD QUESTIONS ARE BETTER THAN BAD ANSWERS.

It's 4.05 am April 18, 2014, and I've just been awakened by three experiences: a loud sound, a deep feeling, and a very recent memory:

* The sound of heavy rain - a rarity recently in our dry city of Melbourne, Australia;

* A deep feeling of grief for the loved ones of hundreds of students, teachers and crew of the Korean cruise-ship _ _ _ _  which
'STAY WHERE YOU ARE!'

and

* A memory from yesterday, Good Friday: beautiful service then an abbreviated Stations of the Cross. Met a retired mainline church pastor for the first time and I heard again: 'You're not *the* Rowland Croucher are you?' (To which I lamely responded: Google tells me I'm the only one on the planet at the moment, spelt that way...'). We'll come back to that *the* in a couple of paragraphs...

'STAY WHERE YOU ARE!'

I got out of bed, put on a couple of layers of warm clothing, and began reminiscing/writing.

From adolescence I've been a pain in the [whatever] because I've challenged people NOT to stay where they were, especially if there are valid alternatives to their belief-system.

'Questions aren't bad' I used to say to the elders in our Brethren Assembly ['Assembly' = 'church', but we didn't use 'churchy' words because we'd 'come out of the churches' and we - alone - had 'the truth'].

Those elders didn't know what to do with stirrers like me. One of those good people used to reply: 'Rowland, don't ask questions, just believe!'

I wrote a page-full of questions when a visiting Brethren Teaching Elder was coming to our group for a 'Question and Answer' evening,  and Mr. Tom Carson, a nice and scholarly man, did his best with them.

Questions like: 'How is it that some our heroes - people like the missionary Hudson Taylor, and the man-of-faith George Muller - did so well when they didn't agree with some of the things Brethren teach?' [Verbal response: 'Ah, but imagine how much more effective they would have been if they'd been enlightened, as we are...' Visual response: eyes in my direction which sort-of said 'How's that for a good answer, young Rowland?'].

'STAY WHERE YOU ARE'

When I left high school and went to the University of Sydney, I got some insights into the 'Stay Where You Are' phenomenon. Change can be threatening for humans, our Psychology professor told us. Especially changing your mind about something. The idea that it was OK to dissent from ideas you imbibed with your mother's milk - my mother was easily the most formative influence in my life in its first decade - confirmed attitude-of-dissent.

(Later I was to return to the University of Sydney to do a Master's degree in Social Psychology, majoring on a study of 'the Diffusion of Innovations', especially in religious organisations: more about that later...).

'STAY WHERE YOU ARE' can be a recipe for intellectual as well as physical death.

Why did those announcements come over the ship's P/A system? Simplest answer: if people in a perceived emergency run around to save themselves it might cause a riot, and RIOTS ARE BAD. Disorder, chaos, must be avoided at all costs (even, apparently,  at the cost of human lives).

Fast forward to the last year or so. I have a Facebook page which asks lots of questions. My 5000 or so friends have - mostly - got used to this nasty habit of mine (but when the questions get too many/hot I'm 'defriended' by some nervous people, so there are always a few vacancies on the Friends' list). Occasionally a conservative person will write something like: 'Rowland, you've lived for three quarters of a century: isn't it time you found some answers? Do you really have to keep stirring?'

Yes, I do.

And yes, I *have* found some answers, but

I still have a deep-seated horror of Bad Answers to Good Questions.

Yesterday's 'Age' newspaper [18/4/2014, p.34] published an obituary for one of my political heroes, the Independent Senator Brian Harradine, who died last week. 'What,' my friends ask, 'Do you actually agree with the views of this very conservative Catholic?' My response: 'Often no, but I like his attitude.' He refused to be 'boxed-in' on many issues, and took his job as a federal politician very seriously. 'He [often] brooded over policy decisions for days and weeks, consulting widely. His decisions often took people by surprise. He argued for what he believed in whether or not it polled well... [His were] principled stances'. He didn't like the idea of a consumption tax (it would 'discriminate against and hurt the poor'.) He worried that 'Australia was giving priority to trade over China's human rights record and that women in third world countries wanted clean drinking water and help with basic material health before abortion... In 1975 Harradine [had been] expelled from the Australian Labor Party for claiming the ALP had links to the Communist movement. However, this gave him the publicity to be elected to the Senate that year and he was successful in every election until he retired in 2005.'

He was truly independent: 'He drank "silver tea" - a concoction of hot water and milk. He was frugal with himself and generous with others... He had that rare ability to fully engage with whoever he was speaking to and would greet cleaning staff the same way he would colleagues. He also took an active interest in the lives of his staff and their families...'

I like that man!

But, again, no, I don't like some aspects of his [Catholic] conservatism - which probably had something to do with the fact that 'he is survived by his second wife, Marion, his six children, her seven children and many grandchildren').

'STAY WHERE YOU ARE'!

As the economic storm clouds gathered in terms of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, the advice from Australia's Federal Treasury was: 'Go early, go hard, and go households'. Fortunately our [Labor] government did just that, and I'm proud that our country weathered that storm better than any other...

~~


“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes” – Albert Einstein

~~


I've stolen this off Joanna Hubbard but it's an interesting for anyone who has the time to read it... Novo Coaching people might like this too!http://www.cihm.leeds.ac.uk/document_downloads/Art_of_Powerful_Questions.pdf

~~

And I stole the quote from here too: http://joannahubbard.wordpress.com/2014/02/18/the-art-of-powerful-questions/ Wonderful blog Joanna Hubbard... how come I haven't been following you before? My bad...


On her deathbed Gertrude Stein is said to have asked 'What is the Answer?' Then, after a long silence, 'What is the question?' (Listening to Your Life: Daily Meditations with Frederick Buechner (p. 125). Harper Collins Inc.

~~


Notes to myself - iPad, Google, Wikipedia (one expert  - with all its faults more reliable than Enc Brit).

~~

Anything at all if it's important to them...

women and men - guilt about masturbation (a woman pastoral leader was told by her senior pastor that people who did it were going to hell)

A woman who when a teenager taught her dog to have sex with her

A mother married to a psychopath was occasionally put into hospital with her injuries. When I arranged a safe place for her and their children, he phoned and threatened to visit me with a gun...

~~


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